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  • I’m going to share with you an embarrassing story. Like most embarrassing stories, this comes from my bone-headed high school days. “Embarrassing” would unfortunately describe a number of the things I remember from high school, but this story is probably one of my most ridiculous. Like most Juniors in high school, I was a confused, insecure kid desperately looking for an identity and direction for my future. The major decisions had been set long before and instilled in me throughout my childhood­—do well in school, go to college, get a nice job. However, as a Junior positioned to start locking in on some of those plans, I realized there were a number of important specifics in those decisions that were still left open. So, I often clung to the thoughts and opinions I valued most, those of my peers and friends...


  • Spiritually, much of the work that God does, is not something totally new, but reminding us of what has already been completed. Remember My promise, remember the truth, don’t forget what is most important. Check out last week's sermon on Joshua 4.


  • When thinking about this blog, all I could think about was the 1999 movie “Blast from the Past.” If you haven’t seen it, it follows the story of a child who was raised in a bunker in what his parents thought was a post nuclear explosion. As the child, played by Brendan Fraser, grows up and goes out into the real world, he sees the destruction, trials, and personal battles of the real world. Basically, the main thing this movie shows is that the only time that you cannot experience the storms this world has, is if you live isolated and underground. In all of that, the character was so shocked by the storms that he literally tried to help everyone in any way possible. For us who experience, see, cleanup, and hold on through many storms in this life, we are often quick to want to be in our “bunkers.”...


  • Last Sunday our text in Joshua 3 showed Israel entering the land God promised to them. It is a momentous and epic chapter of the Bible that the first five books of the Bible have been leading up to for centuries. Read the Sermon Summary here.


  • I started going to church in second grade, so I’ve been hearing about Jesus and grace for as long as I can remember. I could recite the mantra of grace long before it became something I understood I needed.  It’s an undeserved gift. One we open with a beaming grin and a genuine, heart felt, “Thank you!” We wear it proudly, stand behind it whenever we need it to cover our biggest mistakes and shortcomings. “Thank God for grace,” we say. It’s how we tell everyone else about this big, awesome, loving God we’ve met.  It is the bottom line, focal point of the gospel...


  • We are excited about reading the book of Joshua together this fall in our sermon series called the Gospel in Joshua: Seeing Christ in the Old Testament promises.  We are committed to teaching the whole of Scripture and there are three particular things that will be helpful for you in this book...


  • In 2010 I had my heart broken. It was my first “L”-word, adult relationship, and I was blindsided and dumbfounded by her decision that things weren’t going to work out.

     

    That sob story in and of itself is rather unremarkable. Most of us have been down that road. We know how the anger, bargaining, and denial feels.

     

    What I’d like to discuss is what happened after that… or rather what didn’t happen...


  • Over the past two years volunteering with Redemption Kids Ministry, and now as the Director of Kids Ministry, the distinction between “childlike” and “childish” have become more apparent than ever to me. I normally work with the 2nd to 5th graders but I engage with all the kids from toddlers up to 10 year olds when we have the large group lesson. The childish behaviors are very easy to see: immaturity, selfishness, being obnoxious, stealing goldfish. These are the types of behaviors we hope children will learn to put past them and grow out of...


  • Tradition is good in so much that it points to Christ and connects with the saints of history. We must ask: what traditions are we establishing and upholding?...